Crowns & Bridges

Crowns - 900x192

Help relieve symptoms of cracked teeth

Provide strength to a tooth that is otherwise working at 60% strength load

Improved Appearance

Crowns

When a tooth has been damaged, broken or decayed to the point where there is not enough tooth structure left  to place a filling, a crown will be recommended.  A crown, or commonly referred as a cap is a fixed prosthetic, and as its name describes, is replacing the crown of the tooth.

For a crown to be placed, two appointments are required.  At the first appointment the tooth is reduced,  any decay removed, and reshaped.  An impression of the reshaped tooth is taken and sent to a dental labratory to be fabricated, and a temporary crown will be placed to protect the tooth.

Once the completed crown has been made, the dentist will remove the temporary crown, and try the new crown to be sure that it fits properly in place.  Once the bite has been checked, the permanent crown will be cemented into place.

Bridges

Bridges are used to replace missing teeth.  Over time the gaps that are left by missing teeth, eventually cause the remaining teeth to shift, rotate, and drift into the spaces.  This can cause bite problems, as well as a unpleasing appearance.

Like crowns, bridges are also a fixed prosthetic.  A bridge is also sometimes referred to as a fixed partial denture.  The immediate remaining natural teeth on either side of the area are reshaped, and act as anchors (abutments) to the replacement tooth (pontic).  To prepare the area for the bridge requires two appointments.  The first appointment is to reshape the natural supporting teeth for the bridge, as well to take an impression, a temporary bridge placed to protect the prepared area.  Once the final bridge has been fabricated, the dentist will remove the temporary bridge, and sit the permanent bridge, and check the bite, and cement the fixed bridge into place.

Crowns - Before and After

Full Mouth Porcelain Crowns


FAQ

Implant Supported Crowns
Conventional Implant Supported Bridge
Screw Retained Implant Supported Bridge
Implant Supported Bridge Superstructure with Individually Cemented Crowns
Implant Supported Bridge Cemented to Custom Abutments
Fixed Detachable Hybrid Implant Supported Bridge


What is a Crown?

A crown is a dental restoration that covers up or caps a tooth. It is cemented into place and cannot be taken out.

What materials are in a Crown?

Crowns are made of three types of materials:

1. Porcelain: most like a natural tooth in color

2. Gold Alloy: strongest and most conservative in its preparation

3. Porcelain fused to an inner core of gold alloy (Porcelain Fused to Metal or PFM): combines strength and aesthetics

What are the benefits of having a Crown?

Crowns restore a tooth to its natural size, shape and  if using porcelain, color. They improve the strength, function and appearance of a broken down tooth that may otherwise be lost. They may also be designed to decrease the risk of root decay.

What are the risks of having a Crown?

In having a crown, some inherent risks exist both to the tooth and to the crown itself. The risks to the tooth are:

– Preparation for a crown weakens tooth structure and permanently alters the tooth underneath the crown

– Preparing for and placing a crown can irritate the tooth and cause “post-operative” sensitivity which may last for up to 3 months

– The tooth underneath the crown may need root canal treatment about 6% of the time during the lifetime of the tooth

– If the cement seal at the edge of the crown is lost, decay may form at the juncture of the crown and tooth

 

The risks to the crown are:

– Porcelain may chip and metal may wear over time

– If the tooth needs a root canal after the crown is permanently cemented, the procedure may fracture the crown and the crown may need to be replaced

What are the alternatives to Crowns?

Alternatives to crowns are fillings such as composite or silver amalgam. These restorations remove decay and may restore teeth to their original form but are limited because they:

– Do not improve the strength of broken down teeth

– Do not decrease the risk of root decay

– Do not improve the long term function and aesthetics of broken down teeth as well as crowns

How can an existing bite affect a Crown?

Excessive bite forces may lead to the tooth under the crown breaking or loosening x Excessive bite forces may lead to the crown chipping, breaking or loosening

Are there any post treatment limitations once I have a Crown?

Porcelain on a crown may have a good color match with adjacent natural teeth when the crown is placed but less of a match as your natural teeth age. Gum recession may lead to unsightly dark roots or crown margins becoming visible. A crown may chip or break if used for abnormal activities (e.g. biting fishing line, sewing thread or finger nails, opening bottles)

What is a Bridge?

A bridge is a dental restoration that replaces missing teeth. It is made of a false tooth attached to crowns which fit over teeth on both sides of a space. A bridge is cemented in place and cannot be taken out.

What material is in a Bridge?

Bridges are made of three types of materials:

1. Porcelain: most like a natural tooth in color

2. Gold Alloy: strongest and most conservative in its preparation

3. Porcelain fused to an inner core of gold alloy (Porcelain Fused to Metal or PFM) – combines strength and aesthetics

What are the benefits of having a Bridge?

Bridges build back your smile and help you to speak and chew properly by restoring your teeth to their natural size, shape and if using porcelain, color. They help maintain tooth, bite and jaw alignment by preventing remaining teeth from shifting out of position.

What are the risks of having a Bridge?

In having a bridge, some inherent risks exist both to the remaining teeth and to the bridge itself. The risks to the remaining teeth are:

– Preparation for a bridge weakens tooth structure of the anchor teeth and permanently alters the teeth

– Preparing for and placing a bridge can irritate the anchor teeth and cause postoperative sensitivity which may last for up to 3 months

– Anchor teeth for bridges may need root canal treatment about 6% of the time during the lifetime of the tooth

– Anchor teeth may become mobile if there is bone loss around their roots

– If the cement seal at the edge of the crown over an anchor tooth is lost, decay may form at the juncture of the crown and tooth

 

The risks to the bridge are:

– Porcelain may chip and metal may wear over time

– If a tooth needs a root canal after the bridge is permanently cemented the procedure may fracture the bridge and the bridge may need to be replaced

– The longer the bridge the shorter the lifespan; three tooth bridges last 10-15 years on average

What are the alternatives to having a Bridge?

Three alternatives to bridges exist:

1. replace the missing tooth with an implant

2. replace the missing tooth with a removable partial denture

3. leave the space as is

How can an existing bite affect a Bridge?

Excessive biting forces or untreated bite problems may lead to the anchor teeth breaking or loosening. Excessive biting forces or untreated bite problems may lead to the bridge chipping, breaking or loosening

Are there any post treatment limitations once I have a Bridge?

As a bridge is made in one solid piece, it is not possible to floss in between the teeth; special dental aids must be used to maintain the health of the anchor teeth and gums around the bridge. Porcelain on bridge may have a good color match with adjacent natural teeth when the bridge is placed but less of a match as your natural teeth age. Food may become lodged under fixed bridges; gum recession over time may make food impaction unavoidable, even with the most ideal bridge contour. Gum recession may lead to unsightly dark roots or bridge margins becoming visible. A bridge may chip or break if used for abnormal activities (e.g. biting fishing line, sewing thread or finger nails, opening bottles)
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33038 2nd Avenue, Mission BCPhone: 604-826-2960